Website of the Antique Airplane Association and the Airpower Museum Last Update: May 05 2015

Terry Bowden's Blog: Congrats to Lynn Towns - correctly answered the #2 Mystery plane of the twenties

Posted in Members | November 09, 2009
This article is from Terry Bowden's Blog Barnstmr's Random Aeronautics, who has kindly granted permission to re-publish on AntiqueAirfield.com.
Back on Sept 6, just for fun, I posted some photos of several planes with a challenge to my friends to see who might name them first.
The winner with answer to the #2 plane is
Lynn Towns
Answer: Swallow C-165
Built: 1929

Click on the image below to read more information on this sleek bird.



My source for the information on this airplane came from the November 2, 1929 issue of Aviation magazine, page 902.

Aviation Blogs Now Being Aggregated on AntiqueAirfield.com

Posted in News | November 07, 2009

AntiqueAirfield.com is now aggregating and presenting for your reading pleasure antique aviation-related blogs. Several folks have volunteered to have their blogs published, and I've selected a set of back-issues to start us out:

If you're interested in having your blog articles published on AntiqueAirfield.com please email me.

Don Parsons' Blog: Where's Waldo?

Posted in Members | November 07, 2009
This article is from Don Parsons' Blog Flying Antique Airplanes, who has kindly granted permission to re-publish on AntiqueAirfield.com.



I got a little bit done on the Cub on Friday. Messed with the gas tank valve fitting, took the gunky/grimy thing off of the fuel tank and bead-blasted it. It had leaked and was a complete mess. Also, primed the front seat and wheels. Fished out the tank straps out of one of the boxes and bead-lasted them also.

I was really excited when Glenn showed up that afternoon with the stencils for the side of the Standard fuselage. He must have been excited too because he had a gleam in his eye that I hadn't seen for quite a while. We unrolled the stencil, cut the two apart and took one back to the airplane. Thirty minutes later, it was all masked off and ready to paint.
When I left, both sides were painted and drying.

Don Parsons' Blog: Yellow is my favorite color...and Boo-boo Bear likes it too!

Posted in Members | November 07, 2009
This article is from Don Parsons' Blog Flying Antique Airplanes, who has kindly granted permission to re-publish on AntiqueAirfield.com.

Unbeknownst to me, Glenn ame to work and painted the fuselage and gear white this morning. It was quite a surprise when I showed up to the hangar and he said to go take a look. He also said he really wanted to paint it yellow this afternoon so I needed to get my butt in gear to look for runs and loose tape edges. I found 3 runs and 2 loose tape edges which were all quickly fixed.

Late this afternoon he fired up the spray gun again and shot 3 coats of the most beautiful yellow I've ever seen.
Ps to Dave H...I was so happy I nearly cried with joy. It won't be long now!

Don Parsons' Blog: 10-19 Cub Progress - Sanding the cockpit

Posted in Members | November 07, 2009
This article is from Don Parsons' Blog Flying Antique Airplanes, who has kindly granted permission to re-publish on AntiqueAirfield.com.

Finished sanding the airplane today in preparation for the white layer to be put on. We're going to put white on the airplane before the yellow to make the yellow pop and not look green with the silver underneath it. Sanding the outside of the airplane wasn't too bad but there's a lot of tubes in the cockpit so you have to bend in all sorts of contortions to get all the fabric sanded.

Don Parsons' Blog: Cub Progress 10-17 - Are we ever done sanding?

Posted in Members | November 07, 2009
This article is from Don Parsons' Blog Flying Antique Airplanes, who has kindly granted permission to re-publish on AntiqueAirfield.com.

I'm beginning to think that restoring an airplane is easy. All you have to do for about 80% of the restoration is sand. I don't have fingers any more, I have flippers. My fingers have melded into them due to all the wet-sanding and pressure I've put on them in the past couple days.

Ryan Georgi's Blog: Home in Renton after 11 hours and more than 1000 miles. Boy, does my butt hurt!

Posted in Members | November 07, 2009
This article is from Ryan Georgi's Blog Latest Flying Adventure, who has kindly granted permission to re-publish on AntiqueAirfield.com.
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Terry Bowden's Blog: Mystery Planes of the Twenties

Posted in Members | November 07, 2009
This article is from Terry Bowden's Blog Barnstmr's Random Aeronautics, who has kindly granted permission to re-publish on AntiqueAirfield.com.
This blog post has 7 pictures of some pretty rare airplanes. I thought it might be fun to share these with my antique airplane friends and challenge them to identify each one. In a few weeks I will post the answers to these. So, if you know any of them... send me a comment and I will give full credit to the ones sending the first correct answer to each one. So give it your best shot and send me your comment! (click on "comment" at the end of this post.)

#1 You'll be surprised by the date this hot little monoplane was built.

Ever since I was a kid it has always been a fun challenge to name every airplane I see. Even now, I still do it with every TV show or other time I see any airplane. My wife gets so tired of me doing this. I just can't help it, I am an airplane fanatic! Some people do this with cars. Not me. I have a feeling I am not the only airplane nut who does this

My quest to learn all the old airplanes goes back to the days when I always tagged along with Dad on his antique airplane adventures. Dad taught me that a lot of airplanes can be quickly identified by the shape of their tail. He could usually stump me. So it made me work even harder at it. Some time in my early teens, he bought a complete set of the U.S. Civil Aircraft books by Joseph Juptner. Wow... these were awesome. Literally every make and model that was ever certified by the CAA from 1927 through the 1950's was in those books. I really enjoyed learning from those books.

I hope those who read this have fun with it. To be honest, most of these stumped me.

#2 Pretty sleek for its day.

#3 There's actually six airplanes here and some are more recognizable than others see if you can name them all from left to right.

#4 I would love to see one of these now!

#5 This one is tough!

#6 There's a clue on the tail.

#7 Be careful, It might not be what you think it is!

Click below to send your comments...

I will post the anwers soon!
Terry...

Skagit Aero's Blog: Harold pays us a visit

Posted in Members | November 07, 2009
This article is from Skagit Aero's Blog Skagit Aero Museum, who has kindly granted permission to re-publish on AntiqueAirfield.com.

Harold Hanson the founder of the museum paid us a visit this weekend. Here is Harold standing by the Fairchild 24G that is almost complete for our trip to Blakesburg. The engine top over haul is just about done.

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New inter-cylinder baffles being fit to the new cylinders.

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Skagit Aero's Blog: Fairchild 24G Warner Scarab 145 cylinder installation

Posted in Members | November 07, 2009
This article is from Skagit Aero's Blog Skagit Aero Museum, who has kindly granted permission to re-publish on AntiqueAirfield.com.

We’ve taken another step towards getting the Fairchild 24G back in the air. Below you can see the last cylinder #7 on the 145 Warner Scarab being installed, completing an extensive top overhaul at 300 hours. During the cylinder top overhaul we found we had three cracked cylinder heads, two in the exhaust port to valve guide area and one completely cracked from spark plug hole to spark plug hole. Due to our lack of machining capabilities here are the Museum, we sent all 7 cylinders down to Alan Holloway in Quincy, CA for inspection and rework. They replaced one cylinder head and welded the cracks in the remaining two cylinders. We also installed new intake valves and piston rings in all 7 cylinders, our exhaust valves were all well with-in servicable limits. Allan Holloway’s services are highly recommended and they are good people to work with.

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An A&P’s view of installing the intake tube on cylinder #6.

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The 145 Warner Scarab is finally complete. It awaits valve adjustment, spark plugs, harness installation, NACA cowl brackets, and run-in time. Next we'll be completing the annual inspection and reassembly of the rest of the aircraft for test flight.

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